Vaping is not the 'safer' alternative for your kids...

E-cigarettes, vape devices and the juice used in them contain toxins, potentially cancerous agents and dangerous chemicals like diacetyl, which is known to cause a potentially fatal lung disease called popcorn lung. They most often contain nicotine, a highly addictive drug, and a combination of propylene glycol and vegetable glycerin.

A commitment to caring for the community

ACMH Hospital has launched an innovative and necessary community awareness campaign designed to alert parents and teens/tweens about the dangers of e-cigarette use and vaping. As part of the campaign, ACMH is communicating this vital prevention message via social media, printed media and public speaking events throughout the region. The health and safety information contained here has been sourced through numerous reputable and well-established entities such as the American Lung Association, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.

ACMH invites you to join us in spreading this message. For information and materials, contact Kathy Guth at guthk@acmh.org or 724-543-8850.


Let's clear the air... Vaping is not the 'safer' alternative for you or your kids.
It’s dangerous, addictive and full of unanswered questions.

Teens and Addiction

The brain is the last organ in the human body to develop fully. Brain development continues until the early to mid-20s. Nicotine exposure during periods of significant brain development, such as adolescence, can disrupt the growth of brain circuits that control attention, learning, and susceptibility to addiction. Many e-cigarettes contain nicotine, which is highly addictive.

The effects of nicotine exposure during youth and young adulthood can be long-lasting and can include lower impulse control and mood disorders. The nicotine in e-cigarettes and other tobacco products can prime young brains for addiction to other drugs, such as cocaine and methamphetamine
.    SOURCE: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services

Click here for a PARENT'S GUIDE TO TALKING TO YOUR TEEN ABOUT VAPING



 

Myths and Facts

MYTH -Vaping is a healthy alternative to cigarettes.

FACT - Vape e-juice may contain nicotine, chemicals that cause cancer, and can lead to health problems including wheezing, coughing, sinus infections, nosebleeds, shortness of breath and asthma.

 

MYTH - Vaping has nothing to do with smoking regular cigarettes.

FACT - Young people who took up vaping were more than four times more likely to smoke traditional cigarettes a year later, according to one study.

 

MYTH - It’s just harmless water vapor.

FACT - It’s not harmless, and it’s not just water vapor. It may contain toxins, potentially cancerous agents and dangerous chemicals like diacetyl, which is known to cause a potentially fatal lung disease called popcorn lung. It most often contains a combination of propylene glycol, vegetable glycerin, flavorings and nicotine.

 

MYTH - Vapes don’t contain nicotine.

FACT - A 2015 study found that 99 percent of e-cigarettes sold in U.S. convenience stores, supermarkets, and similar outlets contained nicotine, the same highly addictive substance that is found in regular cigarettes. 100 percent of JUULs – teens’ top choice for vaping devices – contain nicotine. And each JUUL pod contains the same amount of nicotine as a whole pack of cigarettes.

SOURCES:
More evidence that e-cigs cause asthma on top of the effects of smoking cigs. University of California San Francisco Center for Tobacco Control and Education. Retrieved from https://tobacco.ucsf.edu/more-evidence-e-cigs-cause-asthma-top-effects-smoking-cigs

E-cigarette use as a predictor of cigarette smoking: results from a 1-yearfollow-up of a national sample of12th grade students. Retrieved from http://tobaccocontrol.bmj.com/content/early/2017/01/04/tobaccocontrol-2016-053291?papetoc

Farsalinos KE, Kistler KA, Gillman G, Voudris V., Evaluation of Electronic Cigarette Liquids and Aerosol for the Presence of Selected Inhalation Toxins. Nicotine Tob Res. 2014; 17:168-74.

Electronic Nicotine Delivery Systems Key Facts; U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Retrieved from https://chronicdata.cdc.gov/Policy/Electronic-Nicotine-Delivery-Systems-Key-Facts-Inf/nwhw-m4ki/data

Sales of Nicotine-Containing Electronic Cigarette Products: United States,2015. American Journal of Public Health. Retrieved from http://ajph.aphapublications.org/doi/abs/10.2105/AJPH.2017.303660?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&rfr_id=ori%3Arid%3Acrossref.org&rfr_dat=cr_pub%3Dpubmed&

Helping to educate and protect the community.

ACMH Hsopital has launched a social media campign to reach area youth and alert them to the danges or vaping and e-cigarettes. You can join us in spreading the word by sharing the messages on the ACMH FACEBOOK PAGE.



PRESENTING THE FACTS:



PROVIDING HEALTH INFORMATION:





JOIN US IN SPREADING THE WORD:
For information, materials or to schedule a presentation, contact Kathy Guth at 
guthk@acmh.org or 724-543-8850.
 

EFFECTS ON LUNGS

The Inhalation of Harmful Chemicals Can Cause Irreversible Lung Damage and Lung Disease

·     A study from the University of North Carolina found that the two primary ingredients found in e-cigarettes—propylene glycol and vegetable glycerin—are toxic to cells and that the more ingredients in an e-liquid, the greater the toxicity.

·     E-cigarettes produce a number of dangerous chemicals including acetaldehyde, acrolein, and formaldehyde. These aldehydes can cause lung disease, as well as cardiovascular (heart) disease.

·     E-cigarettes also contain acrolein, a herbicide primarily used to kill weeds. It can cause acute lung injury and COPD and may cause asthma and lung cancer.

·     Both the U.S. Surgeon General and the National Academies of Science, Engineering and Medicine have warned about the risks of inhaling secondhand e-cigarette emissions, which are created when an e-cigarette user exhales the chemical cocktail created by e-cigarettes.

·     In 2016, the Surgeon General concluded that secondhand emissions contain, "nicotine; ultrafine particles; flavorings such as diacetyl, a chemical linked to serious lung disease; volatile organic compounds such as benzene, which is found in car exhaust; and heavy metals, such as nickel, tin, and lead."

SOURCE: American Lung Association

EFFECTS ON THE HEART

Concerns about the addictive nature of e-cigarettes—now used by an estimated 1 out of 20 Americans—may only be part of the evolving public health story surrounding their use, according to data being presented at the American College of Cardiology’s 68th Annual Scientific Session. New research shows that adults who report puffing e-cigarettes, or vaping, are significantly more likely to have a heart attack, coronary artery disease and depression compared with those who don’t use them or any tobacco products.

“Until now, little has been known about cardiovascular events relative to e-cigarette use. These data are a real wake-up call and should prompt more action and awareness about the dangers of e-cigarettes,” said Mohinder Vindhyal, MD, assistant professor at the University of Kansas School of Medicine Wichita and the study’s lead author.

E-cigarettes—sometimes called “e-cigs,” “vapes,” “e-hookahs,” “vape pens” or “electronic nicotine delivery systems”— are battery-operated, handheld devices that mimic the experience of smoking a cigarette. They work by heating the e-liquid, which may contain a combination of nicotine, solvent carriers (glycerol, propylene and/or ethylene glycol) and any number of flavors and other chemicals, to a high enough temperature to create an aerosol, or "vapor,” that is inhaled and exhaled. According to Vindhyal, there are now more than 460 brands of e-cigarettes and over 7,700 flavors.

E-cigarettes have been gaining in popularity since being introduced in 2007, with sales increasing nearly 14-fold in the last decade, researchers said. But they are also hotly debated—touted by some as a safer alternative to smoking tobacco, while others are sounding the alarm about the explosion of vaping among teens and young adults.

This study found that compared with nonusers, e-cigarette users were 56 percent more likely to have a heart attack and 30 percent more likely to suffer a stroke. Coronary artery disease and circulatory problems, including blood clots, were also much higher among those who vape—10 percent and 44 percent higher, respectively. This group was also twice as likely to suffer from depression, anxiety and other emotional problems.

Most, but not all, of these associations held true when controlling for other known cardiovascular risk factors, such as age, sex, body mass index, high cholesterol, high blood pressure and smoking. After adjusting for these variables, e-cigarette users were 34 percent more likely to have a heart attack, 25 percent more likely to have coronary artery disease and 55 percent more likely to suffer from depression or anxiety. Stroke, high blood pressure and circulatory problems were no longer statistically different between the two groups.

“When the risk of heart attack increases by as much as 55 percent among e-cigarettes users compared to nonsmokers, I wouldn’t want any of my patients nor my family members to vape. When we dug deeper, we found that regardless of how frequently someone uses e-cigarettes, daily or just on some days, they are still more likely to have a heart attack or coronary artery disease,” Vindhyal said.

The study, one of the largest to date looking at the relationship between e-cigarette use and cardiovascular and other health outcomes and among the first to establish an association, included data from a total of 96,467 respondents from the National Health Interview Survey, a Centers for Disease Control and Prevention-fielded survey of Americans, from 2014, 2016 and 2017. The 2015 survey did not include any e-cigarette-related questions. In their analyses, researchers looked at the rates of high blood pressure, heart attack, stroke, coronary artery disease, diabetes and depression/anxiety among those who reported using e-cigarettes (either some days or daily) and nonusers. Those who reported using e-cigarettes were younger than nonusers (33 years of age on average vs. 40.4 years old).

Researchers also compared the data for reported tobacco smokers and nonsmokers. Traditional tobacco cigarette smokers had strikingly higher odds of having a heart attack, coronary artery disease and stroke compared with nonsmokers—a 165, 94 and 78 percent increase, respectively. They were also significantly more likely to have high blood pressure, diabetes, circulatory problems, and depression or anxiety.

The researchers also looked at health outcomes by how often someone reported using e-cigarettes, either “daily” or “some days.” When compared to non-e-cigarette users, daily e-cigarette users had higher odds of heart attack, coronary artery disease and depression/anxiety, whereas some days users were more likely to have a heart attack and suffer from depression/anxiety, with only a trend toward coronary artery disease. Researchers said this could be due to decreased toxic effects of e-cigarette usage, early dissipation of the toxic effects, or the fact that it has not been studied long enough to show permanent damage to portray cardiovascular disease morbidity.

“Cigarette smoking carries a much higher probability of heart attack and stroke than e-cigarettes, but that doesn’t mean that vaping is safe,” Vindhyal said, adding that some e-cigarettes contain nicotine and release very similar toxic compounds to tobacco smoking. Nicotine can quicken heart rate and raise blood pressure.

There are some limitations. For example, the study design doesn’t allow researchers to establish causation, but Vindhyal said it does show a clear association between any kind of smoking and negative health outcomes. He added that self-reported data is also subject to recall bias. The researchers were also unable to determine whether these outcomes may have occurred prior to using e-cigarettes. Further longitudinal data is needed.

SOURCE: The American College of Cardiology


The American College of Cardiology envisions a world where innovation and knowledge optimize cardiovascular care and outcomes. As the professional home for the entire cardiovascular care team, the mission of the College and its more than 52,000 members is to transform cardiovascular care and to improve heart health. The ACC bestows credentials upon cardiovascular professionals who meet stringent qualifications and leads in the formation of health policy, standards and guidelines. The College also provides professional medical education, disseminates cardiovascular research through its world-renowned JACC Journals, operates national registries to measure and improve care, and offers cardiovascular accreditation to hospitals and institutions. For more, visit acc.org.

EFFECTS ON THE BRAIN

The part of the brain that's responsible for decision making and impulse control is not yet fully developed during adolescence. Young people are more likely to take risks with their health and safety, including use of nicotine and other drugs. Youth and young adults are also uniquely at risk for long-term, long-lasting effects of exposing their developing brains to nicotine. These risks include nicotine addiction, mood disorders, and permanent lowering of impulse control. Nicotine also changes the way synapses are formed, which can harm the parts of the brain that control attention and learning.

Addiction - How does the nicotine in e-cigarettes affect the brain? Until about age 25, the brain is still growing. Each time a new memory is created or a new skill is learned, stronger connections – or synapses – are built between brain cells. Young people's brains build synapses faster than adult brains. Because addiction is a form of learning, adolescents can get addicted more easily than adults. The nicotine in e-cigarettes and other tobacco products can also prime the adolescent brain for addiction to other drugs such as cocaine.

Behavior Risks - E-cigarette use among youth and young adults is strongly linked to the use of other tobacco products, such as regular cigarettes, cigars, hookah, and smokeless tobacco. Some evidence suggests that e-cigarette use is linked to alcohol use and other substance use, such as marijuana. And certain e-cigarette products can be used to deliver other drugs like marijuana

Use of Two or More Tobacco Products - Some people have suggested that use of e-cigarettes by young people might "protect" them from using cigarettes. There is no evidence to support this claim. Some studies show that non-smoking youth who use e-cigarettes are more likely to try conventional cigarettes in the future than non-smoking youth who do not use e-cigarettes. And among high school students and young adults who use two or more tobacco products, a majority use both e-cigarettes and burned tobacco products. Burned tobacco products like cigarettes are responsible for the overwhelming majority of tobacco-related deaths and disease in the United States.

SOURCE: U.S. Surgeon General
Your involvement can help make a difference
ACMH invites you to join us in spreading this message.
For information, materials or to schedule a presentation, contact Kathy Guth at guthk@acmh.org or 724-543-8850.

Popcorn Lung

IT MAY SOUND FUNNY... BUT IT'S NO LAUGHING MATTER.
Popcorn lung is a medical condition that damages the bronchioles, the lung's smallest airways. Over time, inflammation associated with popcorn lung causes lung tissues and airways to scar and narrow, causing breathing difficulties.

According to the American Lung Association, using electronic cigarettes or vaping, particularly the flavored varieties, can cause popcorn lung. A 2015 study of flavored e-cigarettes found that 39 out of 51 tested brands contained dactyl, which is commonly identified as a cause of popcorn lung. Manufacturers add diacetyl to the "e-juice" that is vaporized by e-cigarettes, most commonly to the strongly-flavored varieties. Diacetyl occurs in a wide range of different flavored e-cigarette products, ranging from vanilla to caramel and coconut.