CORONAVIRUS UPDATE

ACMH leadership is dedicated to ensuring a successful, aligned medical response to this evolving virus and thanks the community members in advance for their understanding and cooperation as we deal with this healthcare challenge.

CORONAVIRUS DISEASE 2019

COVID-19 VACCINATIONS

First dose vaccinations (Moderna and Pfizer) will be offered at the ACMH Health and Wellness Education Pavilion - 79 Glade Drive, Kittanning, PA from 10 am – 5 pm on the following dates: 

  • October 15th from 10am - 5pm
  • October 22nd from 10am - 5pm
  • October 29th from 10am - 5pm
  • November 5th from 10am - 5pm
  • November 12th from 10am - 5pm
  • November 19th from 10am - 5pm
SCHEDULE YOUR FIRST DOSE COVID VACCINATION HERE

Online registration is required. Bring your current COVID-19 vaccination card, ID and insurance card with you to the appointment. Please call (724) 543-8844 if you need assistance making an appointment.

FOR INFORMATION ON LOCAL COVID-19 VACCINATION AVAILABILITY ELSEWHERE, PLEASE VISIT: https://www.vaccines.gov/


PFIZER BOOSTER SHOT CLINICS

Who qualifies for the Pfizer Covid-19 Booster shot? 
CDC recommends that the following groups SHOULD receive a booster shot of Pfizer's COVID-19 Vaccine at least 6 months after completing their Pfizer primary series (the first 2 doses of a COVID-19 vaccine):

   • People aged 65 years and older
   • Residents aged 18 years and older in long-term care settings
   • People aged 50–64 years with underlying medical conditions (see list below)
 
CDC also recommends that the following groups MAY receive a booster shot of Pfizer COVID-19 Vaccine at least 6 months after completing their Pfizer primary series, based on their individual benefits and risks:
   • People aged 18–49 years with underlying medical conditions (see list below)
   • people aged 18–64 years at increased risk for COVID-19 exposure and transmission 
      because of occupational or institutional setting
 
These recommendations only apply to people who previously received a Pfizer primary series (i.e., the first 2 doses of a COVID-19 vaccine). People can talk to their healthcare provider about whether getting a Pfizer COVID-19 booster shot is appropriate for them.


LIST OF UNDERLYING MEDICAL CONDITIONS
Cancer, Chronic kidney disease, Dementia or other neurological conditions, Diabetes (type 1 or type 2), Down syndrome. Heart conditions (such as heart failure, coronary artery disease, cardiomyopathies or hypertension), HIV infection, Immunocompromised state (weakened immune system), Liver disease, Overweight and obesity, Pregnancy, Sickle cell disease or thalassemia, Smoking (current or former), Solid organ or blood stem cell transplant, Stroke or cerebrovascular disease which affects blood flow to the brain and Substance use disorders

PFIZER BOSTER (3rd Dose) Vaccine Clincs will take place at the ACMH Health and Wellness Education Pavilion, located at 79 Glade Drive, Kittanning, PA on the following dates:

  • October 15th from 10am - 5pm
  • October 22nd from 10am - 5pm
  • October 29th from 10am - 5pm
  • November 5th from 10am - 5pm
  • November 12th from 10am - 5pm
  • November 19th from 10am - 5pm

SCHEDULE YOUR PFIZER BOOSTER SHOT HERE

Online registration is required. Bring your current COVID-19 vaccination card, ID and insurance card with you to the appointment. Please call (724) 543-8844 if you need assistance making an appointment.

MODERNA VACCINE: Currently, the CDC considers individuals who received both doses of the Moderna vaccine to be fully vaccinated. ACMH will continue to monitor guidance from CDC and the PA Department of Health regarding the possibility of booster shots for the Moderna vaccine. Presently, additional dose vaccinations are being administered for immunocompromised individuals. Talk to your doctor or call (724) 543-8844 for more information.


IMPORTANT INFORMATION REGARDING EMERGENCY CARE AT ACMH 

With hospitals across the state stretched thin, hospitals are seeing increased wait times and staffing challenges in emergency rooms. ACMH Hospital is currently experiencing a very high volume of COVID-19 patients and emergent medical cases and is at this time asking patients to come to the emergency room only when they believe that they have an emergency medical condition.

ACMH has a network of healthcare providers ready to help when you seek the appropriate level of care. If you have a non-life-threatening illness or injury, please contact your primary care doctor, an urgent care facility or visit one of our Primary Care Center locations.

Call 911 immediately or visit the emergency department only for critical conditions and life-threatening illnesses or injuries.
 
If you need a COVID-19 test, please contact your physician for an order, or visit one of the many retail pharmacy options in the region offering testing. To find a testing site near you, visit www.pa.gov/covid/stop-the-spread/covid-19-symptoms-testing/.
 
Help us help the community by getting vaccinated. A large percentage of those currently hospitalized for COVID-19 in our region are unvaccinated. The vaccine is the best way to keep yourself and your loved ones healthy and out of the hospital during the pandemic. Visit www.vaccines.gov for information on vaccine availability in our region. An increase in local vaccination rates would translate into less stress on our hospital resources.
 
In addition, wear a mask and keep your distance from others when possible. Regardless of your vaccination status, follow the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s recommendations for preventing the spread of the virus.

 

VISITATION AT ACMH HOSPITAL

Due to the increasing COVID positivity rate in Armstrong County, visitation restrictions will be reinstituted effective Monday, August 30, 2021. Only one support person (visitor) will be permitted for the duration of the patient’s stay.


PATIENT SUPPORT PERSON GUIDELINES:
  • Support person (visitor) must remain in the patient room for the duration of the visit and refrain from visiting other areas of the hospital.
  • Support person must be 18 years or older and healthy.
  • Support person should always be wearing a face mask while in the facility.

VISITATION TIMES:

INPATIENT

10:00 a.m. to 12:00 noon and 5:00 p.m. to 7:00 p.m.

BEHAVIORAL HEALTH UNIT
Monday, Wednesday, Saturday and Sunday
5:00 p.m. to 7:00 p.m.

MATERNITY UNIT 
One support person is permitted per patient

SKILLED NURSING UNIT
Visitation to Skilled Nursing Unit is currently suspended due to CDC and Pennsylvania Department of Health recommendations.
 
 

COVID-19 TESTING

UPDATE: All outpatient COVID-19 swabbing – with the exception of pre-operative patients – will be performed via the drive-thru swabbing station at Entrance "E", Monday through Friday – 10am until 12pm.

Pre-operative patients will continue to be tested in the ACMH lab via the hospital's main lobby: Monday through Friday – 6:30 a.m. until 5:30 p.m. and Saturday – 7am until noon


COVID-19 testing is taking place at the 'E' entrance drive through swabbing station, the ACMH Hospital main lab (pre-operative patinets), the Ford City Health Pavilion, the Cowansville Draw Station, and the Kittanning Draw station. Patients may present for testing at any time during routine Laboratory hours (below).

ACMH would like to remind individuals who may be sick themselves, including those experiencing symptoms such as fever, cough, or sore throat, to not come directly to the hospital Emergency Department. Unless you are seeking emergency medical treatment, you are encouraged to call your primary care provider.

A provider order is required to get a Covid-19 test. If you do not have a primary care provider, you may contact the Pennsylvania Department of Health at 1-877-PA-HEALTH

Main Hospital Lab
Monday through Friday - 6:30am until 5:30pm
Saturday - 7:00am until 12:00 noon

Ford City Health Pavilion
Monday through Friday - 7:00am until 12:00 noon

Cowansville (822 East Brady Road) Draw Station
Tuesday and Thursday - 7:00am until 12:00 noon

Kittanning (260 South Jefferson Street) Draw Station
Monday through Friday - 7:00am until 12:00 noon


E - ENTRANCE ACCESS

Entrance "E" is now open to employees and scheduled surgical patient entry only, from 5 a.m. to 2:30 p.m., Monday thru Friday. Surgical patients will continue to be limited to one support person/driver.

 

REVISED SERVICE HOURS


MAIN LOBBY ACCESS HOURS:
Monday - Friday 5:30am - 5:30pm.
Saturday 5:30am - 3:30pm.
Sunday 5:30am - 12 noon.

ACMH LABORATORY SERVICES HOURS:
Monday - Friday 6:30am - 5:30pm and Saturday 7:00am - 12 noon
Questions regarding ACMH laboratory service, please call (724) 543-8219

DRAW STATION HOURS:
Downtown Kittanning and Ford City Health Pavilion locations: Monday - Friday, from 7:00am to 12:00 noon
Cowansville location: Tuesday and Thursday, from 7:00am to 12 noon

ACMH IMAGING SERVICES HOURS:
Monday - Friday 7:00am - 5:30pm and Saturday 8:00am - 12 noon
Questions regarding ACMH imaging service, please call (724) 543-8787

E-ENTRANCE COLLECTION STATION:
Monday through Friday 11:00am – 1:00pm 

MEDICAL RECORDS OFFICE:
Arrangements can be made to obtain your records by contacting the Medical Records Department at 724-543-8554.  For physician office and clinic records please call 724-548-3804.  Requests can be received M-F from 7:00am - 4:00pm or by leaving a message after hours.

GIFT SHOP AND SNACK BAR:
Monday - Friday: 7:00am - 2:00pm

 

THE IMPORTANCE OF GETTING VACCINATED

https://www.wpxi.com/news/top-stories/pennsylvania-health-officials-discuss-breakthrough-covid-19-cases/SBVNUP5VOFFZ3KOUYO7LDSJ65U/

Pennsylvania reports low number of ‘breakthrough’ COVID-19 cases

 September 15, 2021

The Pennsylvania Department of Health’s report on COVID-19 post-vaccination cases, commonly known as “breakthrough cases,” shows the overwhelming majority of cases, hospitalizations and deaths in the state are among the unvaccinated.

Officials with the Pennsylvania Department of Health talked about the state’s post-vaccination COVID-19 cases at a press conference on Tuesday, September 14th, 2021.

Acting Secretary of Health Alison Beam was joined by Dr. Michael Ripchinski, Chief Clinical Officer for Penn Medicine Lancaster General Health, to discuss what hospitals are currently experiencing as the daily case counts exceed 4,000 statewide.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention defines post-vaccination cases as individuals who are fully vaccinated but test positive for COVID-19 more than 14 days after they complete their full one-dose or two-dose vaccination series. They are also referred to as vaccine breakthrough cases.

The PA online report shows that since January 2021:

  • 97 percent of COVID-19-related deaths were in unvaccinated or not fully vaccinated people. Among a total of 6,472 COVID-19-related deaths identified in Pennsylvania in 2021, the latest data shows 213, or three percent, post-vaccination deaths identified. Cumulative death incidence among the unvaccinated and not fully vaccinated was 7.9 times as high as the death incidence among the fully vaccinated.
  • 95 percent of reported hospitalizations with COVID-19 as the primary diagnosis/cause of admission were in unvaccinated or not fully vaccinated people. Among a total of 34,468 hospitalizations with COVID-19 as the primary diagnosis/cause of admission reported in Pennsylvania, 1,820 were reported to have occurred in fully vaccinated people. These figures account for data from 55 percent of all hospitals and 69 percent of acute care hospitals in Pennsylvania, representing approximately 80 percent of acute care beds in the state.
  • 94 percent of reported COVID-19 cases were in unvaccinated or not fully vaccinated people. Among a total of 639,729 positive cases, there have been 35,389, or six percent, identified post-vaccination cases. Cumulative case incidence among the unvaccinated and not fully vaccinated was 7.1 times as high as the case incidence among the fully vaccinated.

As the number of COVID-19 cases in Pennsylvania is surging to more than 3,000 per day, hospitals are extremely overwhelmed.

 

 

https://triblive.com/news/pennsylvania/pa-officials-94-of-covid-cases-were-in-unvaccinated-or-not-fully-vaccinated-people/

Pa. officials: 94% of COVID-19 cases were in unvaccinated or not fully vaccinated people

The “vast majority” of COVID-19 related cases, hospitalizations and deaths in Pennsylvania since January have been among unvaccinated or not fully vaccinated individuals, according to Department of Health data released Tuesday.

So-called “breakthrough” COVID-19 infections — those that occur 14 days after an individual has received either two doses of Moderna or Pfizer covid-19 vaccines or one dose of the single-shot Johnson & Johnson option — happen, but they are rare and typically result in milder illness, Acting Secretary of Health Alison Beam said.

From Jan. 1 through Sept. 7, there have been 639,729 positive COVID-19 cases in the commonwealth, Beam said during a news conference at Penn Medicine Lancaster General Hospital. Of them, 35,389 (5.5%) have been in fully vaccinated individuals.

“That means that 94% of cases during this time period were in unvaccinated or not fully vaccinated people,” Beam said, explaining that unvaccinated individuals are seven times more likely to contract the virus than those who are fully vaccinated.

Fully vaccinated individuals accounted for 1,820 hospitalizations statewide during the same timeframe. The total number of hospitalizations during that period was 34,468 — meaning that 95% of people hospitalized with the virus weren’t fully vaccinated, Beam said.

Statewide, there have been 6,472 COVID-related deaths from Jan. 1 through Sept. 7 in people who contracted the disease in the 2021 calendar year, according to Beam.

Of those deaths, 213 individuals were fully vaccinated, meaning that 97% of deaths were among unvaccinated people. Unvaccinated individuals are eight times more likely to die of the virus, Beam said.

She said the health department will now try to routinely disclose covid-19 breakthrough data.

“The data that we have is showing once again that even as the more transmissible delta variant becomes more widespread, the COVID vaccines are safe, are effective and help protect against serious illness and death,” Beam said.

 “My hope is that this data encourages everyone who has not yet been vaccinated to speak to their doctor about getting the vaccine as soon as possible,” she said.


HAVE YOU RECOVERED FROM COVID-19 AND WANT TO HELP SAVE LIVES?

Vitalant is collecting plasma from people who have recovered from COVID-19. Called “convalescent plasma,” it contains antibodies to the SARS-CoV-2 coronavirus, which can be given to patients currently fighting COVID-19. 

To be eligible, a potential donor must have:
  • A prior laboratory diagnosis of COVID-19, either by a positive swab test OR a positive test for SARS-CoV-2 antibodies requested by your health care provider
  • Complete resolution of symptoms for at least 28 days
  • All other donor eligibility for an automated plasma donation

Visit https://www.vitalant.org/covidFree for information on becoming a donor.


PREVENTION AND SAFETY

Prevention is the key to protecting yourself and others from this virus. Wash your hands often with soap and water, for at least 20 seconds.  Alcohol based hand sanitizer is acceptable if soap and water are not available. Wear a mask or a cloth facial covering. Cover coughs or sneezes with your elbow. Clean surfaces frequently, focusing on high touch items. To contain the virus, if you are sick, stay home until you are feeling better.

THE IMPORTANCE OF MASKING: CDC recommends that people wear masks in public settings and when around people who don’t live in your household, especially when other social distancing measures are difficult to maintain. Click HERE for more information.

A MESSAGE ON THE IMPORTANCE OF MASKING TO HELP STOP COVID-19 SPREAD: Pennsylvania Governor Tom Wolf reminds Pennsylvanians that mask-wearing is required when entering any business in all counties in the state in both yellow and green phases of reopening. Masks are considered critical in stopping the spread of COVID, now and in preparation for a possible resurgence of the virus in the fall.

The mask requirement is part of Secretary of Health Dr. Rachel’s Levine’s order, “Directing Public Health Safety Measures for Businesses Permitted to Maintain In-person Operations,” which pertains to all counties regardless of the phase of reopening. “In yellow and green counties, it is required that masks are worn when visiting businesses to protect employees, employees’ families, and communities as a whole,” Gov. Wolf said. “Mask-wearing has proven to be an important deterrent to the spread of the virus, and as more counties move to green and more things reopen, we need to be vigilant in our efforts to continue our mitigation efforts.”

A recent study from Cambridge and Greenwich universities in the United Kingdom found that cloth masks, “even homemade masks with limited effectiveness can dramatically reduce transmission rates if worn by enough people, regardless of whether they show symptoms.” Peer-reviewed studies published in scientific journals such as The New England Journal of Medicine corroborate the need for masks and the U.S. Surgeon General said that wearing a mask doesn’t impinge on our freedom – it gives us more freedom from unknowingly spreading COVID-19. The state’s business guidance outlines mask-wearing requirements and additional safety parameters for both employees and customers. Read more on Gov. Wolf’s Process to Reopen PA here.

USE OF CLOTH FACE COVERINGS TO HELP SLOW THE SPREAD OF COVID-19: COVID-19 spreads mainly from person to person through respiratory droplets produced when an infected person coughs, sneezes, talks, or raises their voice (e.g., while shouting, chanting, or singing). These droplets can land in the mouths or noses of people who are nearby or possibly be inhaled into the lungs. Recent studies show that a significant portion of individuals with COVID-19 lack symptoms (are “asymptomatic”) and that even those who eventually develop symptoms (are “pre-symptomatic”) can transmit the virus to others before showing symptoms. To reduce the spread of COVID-19, CDC recommends that people wear cloth face coverings in public settings when around people outside of their household, especially when other social distancing measures are difficult to maintain. For information and instructions on making face coverings, click HERE

SOCIAL DISTANCING: Social distancing means staying away from close contact in public spaces. It includes actions like staying out of places where lots of people gather and maintaining distance — approximately 6 feet — from others. Social distancing also includes minimizing contact with people. All Pennsylvanians are being encouraged to practice social distancing — not just those who are seriously ill or at high risk. Social distancing is a proven way to slow the spread of pandemics.

PRACTICAL ADVICE TO PROTECT YOUR FAMILY VIDEO: "Learn the Facts from a Lung Specialist Doctor: How to Avoid Coronavirus" - A Youtube video posted by a doctor who treats COVID-19 patients in a New York hospital. Click HERE

COMMUNITY STRESS AND ANXIETY: This is a time that all of us are feeling anxious about COVID-19 conditions and feeling stressed while being self-quarantined. This is both natural and expected. The medical community wants to reassure everyone that we will return to a normal state. However, for acute concerns of self and family, the following resources are available:
• Contact the PA Department of Health Crisis Text Line by texting 741-741
• Department of Health website: https://www.health.pa.gov/topics/disease/Pages/Coronavirus.aspx
• CDC website: https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/index.html

 

ONLINE VIRTUAL VISITS

ACMH physician offices offer the convenience and safety advantages of online telehealth visits. Use your internet connected device (PC, Mac, Android or iOS/Apple) that is equipped with a camera and microphone to stay in touch with your primary care provider from the comfort and safety of your home. Call your ACMH physician office to request a telehealth visit.


COMMUNITY SUPPORT

The ACMH Board of Directors, Administration, medical staff, all hospital staff and local EMS providers sincerely express our thanks for the community's willingness to stay home, quarantine and help minimize the spread of the coronavirus.  We continue to ask everyone to stay the course and know that you are making a difference. To all of our community members and organizations that have surrounded us in prayer and support, we thank you as well.  Together we can get through this difficult time. 

Thank You to the following individuals and companies that have donated supplies:
• Snyder Group
• Image Works Painting
• Rosebud Mining
• SBS Contractors, Inc.
• Continental Clay
• Lisa Bartlett
• Liz White 
• Lenape Tech
• Sylvia Hooks
• Dr. William Oleksak
• Lowes
• Rural King
• Sylvan Bio Sciences
• Alterink Tattoo Removal
• Curly Tail Coffee
• Klingensmith Drug Store
• Bergad, Inc.
• Oliver Outdoor
• Harvest Community Church Congregation- Kittanning, PA 
• American Legion in Cowansville
• Lion Clubs of Ford City, Kittanning, and Worthington
• Law Offices of Gregory Swank
• ACMH Ladies Auxiliary
 

LINKS TO ADDITIONAL INFORMATION


COVID-19 spreads mainly from person to person through respiratory droplets produced when an infected person coughs, sneezes, talks, or raises their voice (e.g., while shouting, chanting, or singing). These droplets can land in the mouths or noses of people who are nearby or possibly be inhaled into the lungs. Recent studies show that a significant portion of individuals with COVID-19 lack symptoms (are “asymptomatic”) and that even those who eventually develop symptoms (are “pre-symptomatic”) can transmit the virus to others before showing symptoms.  To reduce the spread of COVID-19, CDC recommends that people wear cloth face coverings in public settings when around people outside of their household, especially when other social distancing measures are difficult to maintain.
 

Social distancing means staying away from close contact in public spaces. It includes actions like staying out of places where lots of people gather and maintaining distance — approximately 6 feet — from others. Social distancing also includes minimizing contact with people. All Pennsylvanians are being encouraged to practice social distancing — not just those who are seriously ill or at high risk. Social distancing is a proven way to slow the spread of pandemics.

1) Wet your hands, turn off the tap, and apply soap.
2) Lather your hands by rubbing them together with the soap. Lather the backs of your hands, between your fingers, and under your nails.
3) Scrub your hands for at least 20 seconds. Need a timer? Hum the “Happy Birthday” song from beginning to end twice.
4) Rinse your hands with water
5) Dry your hands using a clean towel or air dry them.

Use Hand Sanitizer When You Can’t Use Soap and Water